Dada Prints For Sale

Discover Dada prints for sale online. Shop Dada prints today and find the perfect piece to complete your home or office. Explore our collection’s wide range of styles, including political dada prints and dada portrait prints. Our selection features some of today’s most talented artists who are keeping the spirit of Dada alive.…

Interested in adding Dada prints to your art collection? Start your search with the art of German artist Micosch Holland who is heavily influenced by the Dada and Surrealism movements. His mixed media and collage prints are reminiscent of the work of Dada artist Hannah Hoch.

Like Hoch, Holland splices together vintage-style cut-outs, making familiar images seem new and entirely strange, forcing the viewer to reconsider things they once considered to be normal. In Tears of Romeo, Holland intersplices a man’s head with an Alfa Romeo car. The Propagandada nods to Holland’s influencers in the Dada movement, enlarging the DADA letters to form the centre of the piece.

Dada History

Originating in Zurich, against a backdrop of World War One, Dadaism was the art world’s way of interrogating how humans could subject one another to such horror. “Revolted by the butchery of the 1914 World War, we in Zurich devoted ourselves to the arts,” said Dada artist Hans Arp. “While the guns rumbled in the distance, we sang, painted, made collages and wrote poems with all our might.”

These artists blamed Capitalism for causing and prolonging Europe’s war and the art they produced could be called anti-war, at home on the far-left of politics. But it was also satirical and nonsensical, forming the foundations of surrealism that would emerge later in Paris. The movement brought together artists working across different mediums. While Hannah Hoch produced collage in the Dada style, Man Ray turned to photography. Yet what united their work was the way it would ridicule modern norms and values. One of the most famous Dada works was Marcel Duchamp’s 1917 Fountain. The famous urinal, signed R. Mutt, was one of the artist’s ready-mades and tested the idea of what could and could not be art.

The popularity of Dadaism and Duchamp were not limited to the early 1900s but saw a revival of interest in the 1960s, an era that was again testing society’s boundaries. In response to Duchamp’s rising profile, a California art museum organised the first Duchamp retrospective in 1963.

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