New Collection: God Save The Queen!

Posted by Sophie Nibbs on 31st May 2012

As the Diamond Jubilee weekend approaches, we couldn't help but come over all patriotic. In order to celebrate 60 years of Her Majesty's reign, we have put together a collection that celebrates The Queen and all things British. The image of Elizabeth I is perhaps one of the most instantly recognisable and most often represented, but the artists in this collection have managed to provide a fresh perspective on the phenomena of monarchy and life in Britain. Here is a quick look at some of our favourites.


Union (pattern) Jack - 3 (2012), Hormazd Narielwalla

Hormazd Narielwalla's collage work is a celebration of British heritage and tradition. Using original patterns from bespoke Saville Row tailors, Union (pattern) Jack - 3 is from a series of 4 works showing the Jack printed in different colour schemes. Narielwalla appreciates tailoring patterns as beautiful drawings in their own right and his work breathes new life into disused patterns that would otherwise have been discarded but whose sole purpose is in constructing something entirely and iconically British, the Saville Row suit . We love that this work has an initial visual impact, as well as multiple levels that reveal themselves upon closer inspection.

See more of Hormaz Narielwalla's work here.

 


OHMSS (2012), Boa Swindler

 

By using typewriter text to recreate an iconic image of a young Queen Elizabeth, Boa Swindler has managed to add an element of the unfamiliar and uncertain. From both the name of the work OHMSS (On Her Majesty's Secret Service) and her technique, there is a subtle nod to the world of espionage, and the perhaps more underhanded activities that may go on in the name of our queen. We love the humorous twist that Swindler has managed to add to a well-worn image.

See more of Boa Swindler's work here.

 


Of All the Things I Could Have Done: Untitled 2

 

This work by EJ Major is from a series entitled Of All the Things I Could Have Done in which the artist creates intricate still-lifes from the lists that she creates for herself within her studio. These studies consider the idea of productivity and procrastination and the attempt to work ones way out of a creative block. Featured within this work is perhaps the image of The Queen that is most instantly recognisable to us all, upon the Bank of England note. Her image looks out at us, a constant among the subtle chaos of EJ Majors composition.

See more of EJ Major's work here.

 

See the full jubilee-inspired collection here.