5 Reasons You Should Go To This Year's Frieze

Posted in Art Style Files by Rise Art on 09th October 2014

Although the crowds tend to be overwhelming, and the weather is usually less than satisfactory, this year's Frieze should be one to remember. The all-new section, 'Live', focusing on performance art, which is where most of the excitement seems to be based this year.

1. THE NEW 'LIVE' SECTION AT FRIEZE LONDON

In true Frieze fashion, their commitment to what is at the forefront of contemporary art will be exhibited at the very centre of the fair. ‘Live’ is a new section of installations based on performance showcasing work from 6 galleries. These performances will include works produced exclusively for Frieze, and some re-performing of some historical pieces.



The ICA Site at The Old Selfridges Hotel
 

2. THE ICA SITE AT THE OLD SELFRIDGES HOTEL

Due to incorporate performance, music, art, dance and discussion and artists like Isabel Lewis, whose piece is set to evoke a Greek symposium, places where drinking, thinking and erotica were never far from one another. With Norwegian chemist Sissel Tolaas creating the scents for the show, it promises to be a sensual and sensuous feast – and that’s only one show!
 

Disabled Theatre at the Shaw Theatre
Jérôme Bel

3. DISABLED THEATRE AT SHAW THEATRE, EUSTON ROAD

Appearing for the first time in the UK, originally presented at Kunstenfestivaldesarts, Brussels, then dOCUMENTA (13), Germany, Jérôme Bel’s well-received piece involving eleven actors with learning difficulties, is said to be ‘both compassionate and vulnerable’ (Frieze website). Ranging from ages 18 to 44, the actors respond to tasks set by Bel, often humorously.
 

It Happened At Pomona
Michael Asher

4. TOBIAS MADISON

In another UK premiere, Madison, represented by Gallerie Francesca Pia, is showing a piece that will undoubtedly cause great excitement among Frieze-goers. Using two adjacent rooms interwoven by sensoric and microbic technology, he will be testing the relationship between the visitors and the space that encloses them, in a reference to Michael Asher’s 1970 project for Pomona College, where he left the door open for 24 hours to allow the outdoor light and sound into the gallery space. 
 

5. CERITH WYN EVANS AT LONDON ZOO

With the intent of inverting the subject/ object relationship, Evans will create a work in the heart of London’s favourite zoo. The audience will include both humans and animals, closely referencing Gino De Dominic’s exhibition ‘Zodiaco’ of 1970 and Braco Dimitrijevic’s 1998 installations in the Paris zoo, which included live animals.

 

And if you want to keep track of the best in Art and Design, Take our ART STYLE QUIZ and BECOME A MEMBER. It is free and you'll get access to the best new art from top Museums, Galleries and Artists.